Oral transmision at Konya.

One of the designated activities included in our Erasmus+ European program titled “Our Intangible Heritage, a Value for the Future” is the Folklore and Oral transmission traditions (activity P4). In this month some students brought a family elders and asked them to tell some stories about Konya and its surrondings to the class. It was … Read moreOral transmision at Konya.

The Greek Team presents the project leaflet

The students who participate in the new European Erasmus+ Project, materialized by the 1st EPA.L. of Karditsa titled: «Our Intangible Heritage, a Value for the Future», after many difficult efforts and with the support of their teachers, have managed to complete designing the leaflet, the poster and the banner of the program. At present, these … Read moreThe Greek Team presents the project leaflet

Saint Catherine’s Day in Tamsalu

 

 

Kadripäev – Saint Catherine’s Day

According to traditional accounts, Saint Catherine was beheaded by Emperor Maximinus II around 305 AD in Alexandria. 25 November became the commemoration date in the 10th century, and many churches and particularly nunneries in Europe were dedicated to Saint Catherine. In Lutheran countries, this day has also been associated with Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII.  Saint Catherine’s Day marks the arrival of winter and it is associated with women.

In Europe, Saint Catherine became a popular guardian spirit of cattle and an assistant to women in labor.​

Saint Catherine’s Day (Kadripäev) is similar to another day called Saint. Martin’s Day (Mardipäev) and Halloween in  America.

Comparison: Saint Catherine’s Day and Halloween

  • Similarities – on both events people put on clothes that they usually don’t wear and visit other people homes.
  • Differences – on Halloween people make themselves look more like superheroes or creepy creatures. They ask “Trick or treat”, take their candy or perform some mischief if candy is not given.

In Estonia, the day was first celebrated in the 16th century when the ancient religious rituals and daughter’s initiation ceremonies merged with Saint Catherine’s Memorial Day. It was considered a women’s holiday because by that time women managed to finish livetock-related work.

On Saint Catherine’s Day motly girls go outside, turn themselves into kadris, kadri beggars (kadrisandid). Kadri beggars sing, play instruments, dance or recite poems to get premisson to step inside a house. Then they say different wishes to people and the household for good luck, get treats and leave the house singing.

Kadri`s Day Clothing

Kadris have always worn white and pretty clothes, they dress as women. Their masks and costumes are not dramatic, but femalely delicate and lovely. The main components of the costume are stockings, dresses, skirts, coats, scarves, hats, veils and gloves, all white. They also paint their cheeks and nose red. Later they also make fake braids from linen, cotton wool, clothes and other convenient materials. The most important idea is to look beautiful.

 

Gingerbread cookies

 One of the designated activities included in our Erasmus+ project Our Intangible Heritage, a Value for the Future is the presentation of each country’s traditional celebrations and gastronomy. Reena Curphey, the teacher of art and home economics made gingerbread cookies, which are a typical and the most common Christmas treat in Estonia, and also felted Christmas decorations with year 7 and 8 girls in their regular art classes.

Here you can find the recipe, the photos of the delicious gingerbread cookies and felted Christmas decorations.

How to make gingerbread cookies

INGREDIENTS

3/4 cup unsalted butter

3/4 cup brown sugar

3/4 cup molasses

1 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons cinnamon

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon allspice or cloves

1 large egg

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

INSTRUCTIONS

In a saucepan set over low heat, or in the microwave, melt butter, then stir in the brown sugar, molasses, salt, and spices.

Transfer the mixture to a medium-sized mixing bowl, let it cool to lukewarm, and beat in the egg.

Whisk the baking powder and soda into the flour, and then stir these dry ingredients into the molasses mixture.

Divide the dough in half, and pat each half into a thick rectangle. Wrap well, and refrigerate for 1 hour or longer. The dough may be sticky and hard to roll if not thoroughly chilled, so make sure it’s cold before continuing.

Preheat your oven to 350°F. Get out several baking sheets; there’s no need to grease them, though lining with parchment saves effort on clean-up.

Once the dough has chilled, take one piece of dough out of the refrigerator, and flour a clean work surface. Roll the dough 1/8″ to 1/4″ thick; the thinner you roll the dough, the crispier the cookies will be. Flour both the top and bottom of the dough if it starts to stick. Alternatively, place the dough on parchment, and put a sheet of plastic wrap over it as you roll, pulling the plastic to eliminate wrinkles as necessary when rolling; this will keep dough from sticking without the need for additional flour.

Cut out shapes with a floured cookie cutter, cutting them as close to one another as possible to minimize waste.

Transfer the cookies to ungreased cookie sheets (or, if you’ve rolled right onto the parchment, remove the dough scraps between the cookies). Bake the cookies just until they’re slightly brown around the edges 8 to 12 minutes, or until they feel firm. Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets for several minutes, or until they’re set. Transfer them to a rack to cool completely. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Decorate the cookies with icing or cookie glaze.

Based on the recipe:

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/gingerbread-cookies-recipe

Greek Honey Cookies

One of the designated activities included in our Erasmus+ European program titled “Our Intangible Heritage, a Value for the Future” is the presentation of each country’s traditional celebrations and gastronomy (activity P6). To this end, two of the school’s teachers decided to actually make a Greek traditional Christmas treat in class with a group of … Read moreGreek Honey Cookies

“Drystone walling” included on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage

The Art of drystone walling, the ancient building method used in Slovenia, Cyprus, Greece, Bulgaria, Croatia, Italy, Switzerland, France and Spain, has been included on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity The art of dry stone walling, knowledge and techniques concerns the knowhow related to making stone constructions by stacking … Read more“Drystone walling” included on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage